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Social Media Tools

10 Hot Social Media Management Tools

Top 10 Tools For Managing Your Social Media Accounts

Attempting to juggle each and every one of your social media accounts can be tricky, scary and time-consuming. For example, while you’re busy updating your Facebook status, you might have forgotten to favorite a tweet. Speaking of tweets, when is the best time to send one out to followers? Ugh. It can seriously give you a migraine.

Thankfully, we live in a world and time where developers are rectifying that problem! Now there are plenty of tools that can easily sync with all of our social media accounts so that we can update and monitor all of accounts in convenient location. The only downside is that some great tools have been disabled or acquired by some of the major brands – TweetDeck belongs to Twitter, Summify was acquired and will be shut down by Twitter, for example. But, that doesn’t mean that you still can’t find software to manage all of your social media accounts.

Social Media Tools

To make your life easier, are here the top 10 tools for managing your social media accounts.

10. Crowdbooster

realtime dashboard Crowd boosterImage Source: Crowdbooster

Unlike other selections on this list, Crowdbooster focuses on gathering data from your Facebook and Twitter feeds. While it will not compile different social media accounts into one convenient location, it will give you some vital information regarding your social media strategy, such as when people are most likely to view your latest images or video uploads. Other features include being able to analyze impressions, total reach, and engagement. This will allow you to modify and improve your strategy by knowing what it working and what is not. Another cool feature is receiving alerts on new Twitter members who may be interested in you or your brand.

Unfortunately, Crowdbooster does not offer a free option, but the lowest plan will only set you back $9 a month and allows up to 50,000 followers all together. It may be worth the investment if you run a business.

9. SocialFlow

SocialFlow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you run a business or an online marketing campaign, you already know how important it is to share content on social media. By utilizing its own unique optimization algorithm that taps into your Twitter and Facebook data, SocialFlow takes into consideration three factors: “relevant message (which of your messages is most likely to connect), right audience (who’s online now), and right time (when’s the perfect moment to publish this content).” In short, SocialFlow makes sure your message is sent out during the most optimum time.

SocialFlow is another service you’ll have to pay for, but they offer flexible plans that begin around $99 a month.

8. Bitly

bitley screenshot

Bitly does a lot more than just shortening links that are posted to your social media accounts, which keeps them neat and clean. It also features real time-analytics, bookmarking your favorite sites and pages and having the ability to track clicks. Bitly works across multiple platforms, such as Twitter and Facebook, and is free. Yep. Free.

7. Everypost

 Top 10 Tools For Managing Your Social Media Accounts Image Source: App Store

Everypost is a handy app that basically allows you to post all of your updates onto the major social networks from one place at one time. Simply write your message, add photos or videos, and hashtags then send off to Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Facebook, LinkedIn, Tumblr, or via e-mail (even all at the same time, if you want). Another cool features is the Twitter text shortener. This will automatically shorten tweets so that they are under 140 characters. While there may be some glitches to correct, this is a useful, and free, app.

6. Sprout Social

monitor main img3 Top 10 Tools For Managing Your Social Media Accounts Image Source: Social Sprout

Sprout Social is another nifty tool that can manage, post, monitor, and analyze multiple social media accounts from one location. For example, you could search for content within its Feedly integration, schedule posts, and reply to messages on Facebook and Twitter. You can also monitor messages across Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and LinkedIn personal profiles all through on streaming inbox. But, that’s not all. Sprout Social also offers analytics so that you can visualize important metrics.

You can sign up for a free trial, but after that you’ll have to select one of three packages that range from $39, $59 or $99 per month. It’s a little higher cost than other tools, but can be a great investment for businesses that are super social.

5. Buffer

unnamed2 Top 10 Tools For Managing Your Social Media Accounts Image Source: Google Play

Buffer is one of the most popular social media message scheduling and sharing applications available. With one easy click you’ll be able to share content and schedule posts via Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google+. Basically, it allows you to stagger content throughout the day so that social media feeds have consistent updates. And, there’s analytics about engagement and reach of your posts.

Buffer is free, but only for a short period.  However, you can schedule ahead of time, which is really handy. For just $10 a month you can schedule as many posts as you want, use up to 12 social profiles, and have two team members assigned to one account.

4. Spredfast

coordinate social activity Top 10 Tools For Managing Your Social Media Accounts Image Source: Spredfast

Spredfast is an outstanding tool if you’re looking to measure data gathered from Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Flickr, such as being able to see how many people you’ve reached and whether or not your target audience is engaging with you. The data is clearly presented in formatted graphs. Besides the advanced analytics tools, there’s other useful features, like a calendar that informs when the optimal tweeting times occur.

3. Tweepi

tweepi Social Media toolsImage Source: Tweepi

Of all the social media platforms, Twitter can be the most daunting. If that’s the case for you, Tweepi is just what you have been looking for. There’s a quick management tool which will allow to flush unfollowers, cleanup inactives, reciprocate by following, and follow new interesting tweets. A simple, and sometimes brutal, way to keep your Twitter account tidy.

There are Silver ($7.49 a month) and Platinum ($14.99 a month) to choose from. However, if you purchase Tweepi annually, it’s 17% cheaper.

2. SocialOomph

2014 01 28 13 12 01 Tools to Boost Your Social Media Productivity 637x283 Top 10 Tools For Managing Your Social Media Accounts Screenshot of SocialOomph on 1/28/14

SocialOomph has the ability to schedule tweets for the entire day and auto-follow your new followers, so you can something other than schedule tweets and follow people. You can also use the dashboard to combine Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Plurk, and your blog into one spot to schedule posts or monitor social media activity.

While the app has a free version, there’s a paid “professional” option that features a ton of helpful tools to boost your social media productivity.

1. HootSuite

Organize your Social NetworksImage Source: Google Play

If you’re looking for the best, accept no substitutes. HootSuite is the most popular social media management tool for a reason. Besides being able to execute campaigns across multiple social networks from one web-based dashboard, you can also manage social media, track conversations, and measure campaign results. HootSuite also offers a custom built-in analytics system and the capability to schedule posts on all platforms.

Hootsuite offers a free, pro ($8.99 per month), and enterprise options to suit the needs of individuals, small businesses, and large organizations.

 

Syndicated Content original source: http://www.searchenginejournal.com/top-10-tools-managing-social-media-accounts/87843/
Author  :Albert Costill is a Writer at Alpha Brand Media

 Just for good measure here is a video by kavash bastani on 
Social Media 2014 Revolution

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYedZth9ArM[/youtube]
 
 
What is your favorite social media management tool?
 

Must-Have Social Meta Tags for Your Websites

Must-Have Social Meta Tags for Twitter, Google+, Facebook and More

- Posted by to Social Media

At Moz, we strive to include social media metadata in all new pieces of content that we publish. This allows us to optimize for sharing Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Pinerest by defining exactly how titles, descriptions, images and more appear in social streams.

Think of it as conversion rate optimization for social exposure.

The implications for SEO are also significant. We know from experience and studies that the right data, including optimized images, helps content to spread, which often leads to increased links and mentions.

Knowing exactly which social meta tags to include can be confusing even to experienced webmasters. This post by Micheal King is a huge help, and WordPress publishers who use Yoast's SEO plugin are well ahead of the game. For the rest of us, consider the different structures supported by the major social platforms:

  • Twitter Cards: Summaries, Images, Galleries, Apps, Video, Audio, and Products
  • Pinterest Rich Pins: Products, Recipes, Movies, and Articles
  • Google+: Articles, Blog, Book, Event, Local Business, Organization, Person, Product, and Reviews
  • Facebook: Articles, Photos, Audio, Video, and more

To help ease this problem, I created four social media tag templates that you can fill out, customize for your own use, and share with your team and others.

How to use these templates

Simply copy and paste the template into the text editor of your choice. Make sure to replace any orange or green text with your own data, and customize, eliminate or add any tags you find necessary.

The first three of these templates are optimized using a typical "article" markup and data, ideal for blog posts and most written content. The final template contains markup for product pages.For other post types, such as book or recipes, refer to documentation linked at the end of this post for reference on what to customize.

When you are done, don't forget to test and apply for approval.

1. The Minimal Template

This slimmed back version runs lean and fast. It contains a bare minimum of data for optimized sharing across Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Pinterest.

Title tags and meta descriptions are included even though they aren't technically social media meta tags. This is because they can be used by Google+ and other social media platforms, and it is best practice to include them on every page you publish.

Minimum Social Media Tag Template: Article

<!-- Place this data between the <head> tags of your website -->
<title>Page Title. Maximum length 60-70 characters</title>
<meta name="description" content="Page description. No longer than 155 characters." />

<!-- Twitter Card data -->
<meta name="twitter:card" value="summary">

<!-- Open Graph data -->
<meta property="og:title" content="Title Here" />
<meta property="og:type" content="article" />
<meta property="og:url" content="http://www.example.com/" />
<meta property="og:image" content="http://example.com/image.jpg" />
<meta property="og:description" content="Description Here" />

2: The Standard Template

The standard template represents a more robust implementation of social tags and is meant to work across all platforms. In addition to all of the features of the mimimal template above, the standard template includes the following:

  • The basic Twitter Summary card
  • Twitter thumbnail image
  • Facebook Page Insights

Standard Social Media Tag Template: Article

<!-- Place this data between the <head> tags of your website -->
<title>Page Title. Maximum length 60-70 characters</title>
<meta name="description" content="Page description. No longer than 155 characters." />

<!-- Twitter Card data -->
<meta name="twitter:card" content="summary">
<meta name="twitter:site" content="@publisher_handle">
<meta name="twitter:title" content="Page Title">
<meta name="twitter:description" content="Page description less than 200 characters">
<meta name="twitter:creator" content="@author_handle">
<-- Twitter Summary card images must be at least 200x200px -->
<meta name="twitter:image" content="http://www.example.com/image.jpg">

<!-- Open Graph data -->
<meta property="og:title" content="Title Here" />
<meta property="og:type" content="article" />
<meta property="og:url" content="http://www.example.com/" />
<meta property="og:image" content="http://example.com/image.jpg" />
<meta property="og:description" content="Description Here" />
<meta property="og:site_name" content="Site Name, i.e. Moz" />
<meta property="fb:admins" content="Facebook numeric ID" />

3: The Full Monty

This is the monster! In addition to all the data contained in the standard template, the full template contains:

  • Google Authorship and Publisher Markup. Although this data doesn't change your content appearance in Google+, it potentially add links to your Google+ pages in search results.
  • Schema.org article markup
  • Twitter Summary card with large image
  • Expanded Open Graph article data

Full Social Media Tag Template: Article

<!-- Update your html tag to include the itemscope and itemtype attributes. -->
<html itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article">

<!-- Place this data between the <head> tags of your website -->
<title>Page Title. Maximum length 60-70 characters</title>
<meta name="description" content="Page description. No longer than 155 characters." />

<!-- Google Authorship and Publisher Markup -->
<link rel="author" href="https://plus.google.com/[Google+_Profile]/posts"/>
<link rel="publisher" href=”https://plus.google.com/[Google+_Page_Profile]"/>

<!-- Schema.org markup for Google+ -->
<meta itemprop="name" content="The Name or Title Here">
<meta itemprop="description" content="This is the page description">
<meta itemprop="image" content="http://www.example.com/image.jpg">

<!-- Twitter Card data -->
<meta name="twitter:card" content="summary_large_image">
<meta name="twitter:site" content="@publisher_handle">
<meta name="twitter:title" content="Page Title">
<meta name="twitter:description" content="Page description less than 200 characters">
<meta name="twitter:creator" content="@author_handle">
<!-- Twitter summary card with large image must be at least 280x150px -->
<meta name="twitter:image:src" content="http://www.example.com/image.html">

<!-- Open Graph data -->
<meta property="og:title" content="Title Here" />
<meta property="og:type" content="article" />
<meta property="og:url" content="http://www.example.com/" />
<meta property="og:image" content="http://example.com/image.jpg" />
<meta property="og:description" content="Description Here" />
<meta property="og:site_name" content="Site Name, i.e. Moz" />
<meta property="article:published_time" content="2013-09-17T05:59:00+01:00" />
<meta property="article:modified_time" content="2013-09-16T19:08:47+01:00" />
<meta property="article:section" content="Article Section" />
<meta property="article:tag" content="Article Tag" />
<meta property="fb:admins" content="Facebook numberic ID" />

Bonus: The Product Template

For merchants, product markup is very popular, and usually easy for developers to implement in their shopping cart software. The product template differs from article markup in only a few ways:

  • Modified <html> tag to reflect schema.org product data
  • Twitter Product Card includes required data labels
  • Open Graph data includes price and currency data

Product Social Media Tag Template

<!-- Update your html tag to include the itemscope and itemtype attributes. -->
<html itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product">

<!-- Place this data between the <head> tags of your website -->
<title>Page Title. Maximum length 60-70 characters</title>
<meta name="description" content="Page description. No longer than 155 characters." />

<!-- Schema.org markup for Google+ -->
<meta itemprop="name" content="The Name or Title Here">
<meta itemprop="description" content="This is the page description">
<meta itemprop="image" content="http://www.example.com/image.jpg">

<!-- Twitter Card data -->
<meta name="twitter:card" content="product">
<meta name="twitter:site" content="@publisher_handle">
<meta name="twitter:title" content="Page Title">
<meta name="twitter:description" content="Page description less than 200 characters">
<meta name="twitter:creator" content="@author_handle">
<meta name="twitter:image" content="http://www.example.com/image.html">
<meta name="twitter:data1" content="$3">
<meta name="twitter:label1" content="Price">
<meta name="twitter:data2" content="Black">
<meta name="twitter:label2" content="Color">

<!-- Open Graph data -->
<meta property="og:title" content="Title Here" />
<meta property="og:type" content="article" />
<meta property="og:url" content="http://www.example.com/" />
<meta property="og:image" content="http://example.com/image.jpg" />
<meta property="og:description" content="Description Here" />
<meta property="og:site_name" content="Site Name, i.e. Moz" />
<meta property="og:price:amount" content="15.00" />
<meta property="og:price:currency" content="USD" />

 

Tools for testing and approval

A. Twitter Validation Tool

 

https://dev.twitter.com/docs/cards/validation/validator

 

Before your cards show on Twitter, you must first have your domain approved. Fortunately, it's a super-easy process. After you implement your cards, simply enter your sample URL into the validation tool. After checking your markup, select the "Submit for Approval" button.

B. Facebook Debugger

 

 

https://developers.facebook.com/tools/debug

 

 

You don't need prior approval for your meta information to show on Facebook, but the debugging tool they offer gives you a wealth of information about all your tags and can also analyze your Twitter tags.

C. Google Structured Data Testing Tool

 

 

http://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/richsnippets

 

 

Webmasters traditionally use the structured data testing tool to test authorship markup and preview how snippets will appear in search results, but you can also use see what other types of meta data Google is able to extract from each page.

D. Pinterest Rich Pins Validator

 

 

http://developers.pinterest.com/rich_pins/validator/

 

 

Like Twitter, Pinterest requires an approval process to enable Rich Pin functionality. Use the Rich Pin Validator tool to test your data markup and apply for approval at the same time.


Tips and best practices

Optimizing for images

The image you link to in your social data does not actually have to be on the page, but it should represent your content well. The image allows you to controll what people see when they share your content, so it's important to use quality images.

Every social platform has different standards for sizing. Typically, it's easier to keep it simple and choose one image size that will work for all services.

  • Twitter thumbnail: 120x120px
  • Twitter large image: 280x150px
  • Facebook: Standards vary, but an image at least 200x200px works best. Facebook recommends large images up to 1200px wide.

In short, larger images offer you the most flexibility. When in doubt, test each page using the appropriate tool below to see exactly how your images will appear in snippits.

The importance of Open Graph data

If you could choose only one type of meta data to include, your best bet is Open Graph. That's because all the platforms can use it as a fallback, including Twitter to a large degree.

Facebook page insights

The meta property "fb:admins" requires that you enter your numeric Facebook id number, and gives you access to analytics about how your website content is shared on Facebook. Read more about Page Insights, including how to set it up and discover your numeric id.

Further resources

Use these templates as a starting point, but you can customize them in millions of ways. A few valuable resources to aid your journey:

What are your best tips for optimizing your content for sharing? Let us know in the comments below.

This article is a reproduction because I thought this is such valuable information to share, I have left all credit and links that appeared in the original article and given full credit to the original author over at Moz.
Original Article created by Cyrus-ShepardCyrus Shepard is Senior Content Astronaut for Moz. Follow him on Twitter and Google+